Articles Tagged with legal ethics

Judicial Referee and retired Judge, Gary Cassavechia, has imposed a March 21, 2017 deadline for the beneficiaries of the late Geraldine Webber to reach a settlement in a legal malpractice suit with Webber’s former attorney, Gary Holmes.  Continue reading

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”) has suspended an attorney from practicing law for 6 months, following a determination that he had been practicing without a license, and falsely represented himself as a licensed attorney.   In the matter of Peter Larkowich, a Massachusetts attorney was administratively suspended for failing to pay his dues to the Massachusetts bar.  He did not apply to be reinstated, nor did he notify his clients of his suspension, or withdraw from his current cases. Continue reading

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“Massachusetts SJC”) has affirmed an order transferring an attorney to inactive status for a period of one year, following a determination by the Maine Supreme Judicial Court (“Maine SJC”) that the attorney was unfit to practice law.  In the matter of Suzanne T. Dwyer-Jones, the Maine Board of Bar Overseers (“Maine BBO”) alleged that an attorney had substantial mental health and substance abuse problems.    Continue reading

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”), located in Boston, has suspended an attorney from practicing law after he was convicted of multiple criminal charges.  In the matter of Jason K. Betts, an attorney admitted to sufficient facts for a finding of guilty on charges of resisting arrest, violating the conditions of his probation, disturbing the peace, driving under the influence, and negligent operation of a motor vehicle. Continue reading

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”) has entered an order suspending an attorney after finding that he helped a non-lawyer set up a law practice.  In the Matter of Barry E. O’Neill, a lawyer, who was a business person and had never actively practiced law, helped a woman establish a law practice before she was licensed.

Continue reading

The Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”), located in Boston, Massachusetts, has entered an order suspending an attorney after finding that he had falsely certified that he was covered by professional liability insurance.  In the Matter of Eric J. Crane, an attorney accepted appointments from the Massachusetts Committee for Public Counsel Services (“CPCS”) to represent indigent criminal defendants.

Continue reading

The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”) has entered an order suspending a Boston Attorney after finding that he charged a client an illegal fee.  In the Matter of Jose Luis Serpa, the Committee for Public Counsel Services (“CPCS”) appointed an attorney to represent a client in a criminal matter free of charge.  Nevertheless, the attorney requested payment of $1,250 from the client, who then paid him $400.

Continue reading

The Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”), located in Boston, has entered an order disbarring a Massachusetts attorney after finding that she deposited client funds into her personal bank account and used the money for personal expenses.  In the Matter of Wendy Jane Rickles, an attorney stole funds from two separate clients, and provided false information to two tribunals.

Continue reading

A single justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”), located in Boston, has entered an order disbarring an attorney after finding that he used client funds for personal expenses.  In the Matter of Reinaldo Gonzalez, an attorney stole funds belonging to three separate clients.

Continue reading

A single justice of the Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”), located in Boston, Massachusetts, has entered an order indefinitely suspending of an attorney after finding that he had misused client funds.  In the matter of Michael J. Fenton, an attorney was hired as counsel for the executor of an estate, including as closing attorney for the sale of the decedent’s residence.  After the sale closed, the attorney received the proceeds, which were to be distributed equally to the decedent’s three sons.

Continue reading